The description-experience gap in risky choice framing

Prof Gaëlle Vallée-Tourangeau will be presenting at the 38th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society on Thursday 11th August 2016, 11:45

WHEN

Wednesday, August 10 – Saturday August 13, 2016

WHERE

Philadelphia Convention Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,

THE DESCRIPTION-EXPERIENCE GAP IN RISKY CHOICE FRAMING.

COAUTHORS:

FRÉDÉRIC VALLÉE-TOURANGEAU

MADHURI RAMASUBRAMANIAN

The 6 page paper will be published in the proceedings.

For further information about this event please visit COGSCI 2016 website, the conference programme for Thursday 11th can be found here.

DART research featured at the European Society of Philosophy and Psychology, 2016

Dr Amélie Gourdon,  will be presenting the poster session at European Society of Philosophy and Psychology : August 10 -13th 2016

WHEN

Wednesday 10th August -Saturday 13th, 2016

WHERE

University of St Andrews, Scotland

DIRECTIONALITY OF PROBABILITY PHRASES IS NOT DETERMINED BY THEIR LINGUISTIC HEAD

ABSTRACT

Directionality of probability phrases is not determined by their linguistic head

Verbal probabilities (e.g., it is likely) are suggested to be preferred to numerical probabilities by speakers who express uncertainty (Erev & Cohen, 1990). These phrases are made of a modal adjective (e.g., it is possible) or noun (e.g., there is a possibility), sometimes a verb (e.g., it may be), with, in cases, the addition of a

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DART research featured at the International Conference on Thinking: August 2016

DART PhD research student Niyat Henok,  will be speaking at International Conference on Thinking on Saturday 6th August 2016.

WHEN

Thursday 4th August -Saturday 6th, 2016

WHERE

Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

DOES INTERACTIVITY HELP OR INHIBIT TRANSFER? THE ROLE OF TRANSFER AND MATERIAL INTERACTION IN INSIGHT PROBLEM SOLVING.

ABSTRACT

The ‘Aha!’ experience, the sudden burst of insight, has often been explained through an internal cognitive framework. However, external actions may facilitate insight. The role of transfer and material interaction in insight problem-solving was investigated using the Cheap Necklace Problem. In Experiment 1, participants completed the same problem twice after a two-week gap either using Continue reading

DART research featured at the 3rd International Conference on Interactivity, Language and Cognition

Prof Gaëlle Vallée-Tourangeau will be presenting a paper and hosting a workshop at the Third International Conference on Interactivity, Language and Cognition.

WHEN

Wednesday, 29th  June 2016  – Friday 1st July

WHERE

Kingston University, Knights Park

Presentation: Wed 29th June, 14:00, Location TK402

Framing volte-face: The description-experience gap in risky choice framing

ABSTRACT

Building upon the description-experience gap, we examined whether the classical framing effect observed with the Asian Disease problem could be reversed when people make decisions from experience. Ninety- five university students were randomly allocated to one of three conditions: Description (where the problem was presented on paper), Sampling (where the participants were allowed to sample through the outcomes presented as a pack of cards) and Interactive (where the participants were invited to spread out all possible outcomes in a sample) and made three gain-framed choices and three loss-framed choices, with two filler tasks after the first three choices. The results revealed a significant interaction effect between framing Continue reading

DART research featured at the FUR2016 Conference

Egle Butt, one of the DART research student will present new findings from her PhD work in one of the parallel sessions of the FUR2016 Conference entitled: Risk attitudes I.

When Are Severe Outcomes More Probable? – The Role of Base Rate

WHEN

Tuesday, 28 June 2016 from 11:00 to 12:30 (BST)

WHERE

Warwick University – Coventry, CV4 7AL

Abstract

Communicating risk of uncertain outcomes (e.g., court sentence) often involves probabilities. People prefer to receive probabilistic information numerically (e.g., there is 70% chance that your case will not end in your favour), but they prefer to express it verbally (e.g., it is likely that your case will not end in your favour) (Erev & Cohen, 1990). Consequential decisions (e.g., should I take the plea bargain?) thus require an adequate interpretation of verbal probabilities. Some research suggests Continue reading